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Resident Critic for www.ClevelandStageAlliance.com www.tpography.com – Kevin Kelly

TPOGraphy.com Editor: Robert Kowalewski

Month

May 2014

Laughter League presents Laughs of Future Past

Who knew Brunswick, OH was so funny? Well, I enter into evidence the Laughter League, a collection of insane and fearless comedians that tackle original material like the security team at the Cher concert, when I got a little too excited. But I digress. Last night I was witness to the last rehearsal of the current show “Laughs of Future Past”. And I say rehearsal, but I can assure you that each night of their performance will be different in some way, because it was evident that all hell can break loose at a moment’s notice. The spontaneity is a gift.

This group is currently led and directed by Patrick Ciamacco, who is also the Founder and Artistic Director of the acclaimed Black Canvas Theatre, located in the 78th Street Studios. The Laughter League also performs at this venue. There is a stable of comedic horses to pick from, but at this outing the cast included: Joe Ciamacco, Billy DePetro, Perren Hedderson, Noah Hrbek, Seth Hrbek, Chuck Klein, and the man himself, Patrick Ciamacco. This current version includes delightful twists on ordinary situations, current commentary on the local film business, sales techniques, a fresh look at the NSA back office, and a slice of wildlife that would have Jack Hanna gasping for breath.

The opening music by Flo Rida tells us that “Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh, Sometimes, I get a good feeling”. Well to be honest, I got a good feeling a lot. There is something here for everyone, and a couple of laughs that could be considered pushing the limit of political correctness. But this is a group of fearless funny men. Several sketch scenes tickled my funny bone a little bit more. The opening transit ride featured some butt shaking that could easily be rap worthy. The X-Men parody is a scream, or should I say X’ed- Men. Their unique skills had me rolling, and their leader, oh man, just wait. I loved the searing look at “extras” in film work. The sketch about how the “business” of Girl Scout Cookies goes wrong is ridiculous fun. Patrick Ciamacco has a grand time with his unique version of “Let it Go”, and does he ever.

There are many more sketches in the evening that provide ample opportunity to have a great time. The fact that this is all original material is very impressive. An evening filled with tremendous risk and comedic reward.

http://laughterleague.com/purchase-tickets

Tpography.com

5/30/14

Please credit Tpography.com with any quotes. Thank you.

 

VOODOO MACBETH at Ensemble Theatre in collaboration with The Cleveland Shakespeare Festival

In 1935, the Federal Theatre Project, a part of Roosevelt’s New Deal initiative for supporting the arts when private funding was crippled by the Depression, established the Negro Theatre Project in New York. VOODOO MACBETH is a common nickname for The Federal Theatre Project’s 1936 New York production of William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth”. This production featured an all black cast and was originally directed by a 20 year old Orson Welles. In a creative move, Welles adapted the setting to a Caribbean location, that most people have associated with Haiti. Within the new location, that allowed witchcraft to be replaced by a more connectable Voodoo magic. This original production electrified Harlem, and played to packed houses.

Ensemble Theatre in collaboration with The Cleveland Shakespeare Festival is presenting that version of VOODOO MACBETH. The production is directed by Celeste Cosentino and Tyson Douglas Rand. The physical setting designed by Ian Hinz, provides a relatively open space with three projection screens that act as location or suggested backdrops to frame the action. So the power of the production is really left to the actors to create the magic, and the directors to guide the demanding performances that are essential to the Bard.

The matinee performance seemed to lack the overall energy and drive that is needed to captivate the audience. Of course, that didn’t stop one audience member from taking 10 flash pictures in the middle of the show, which was handled appropriately by the staff.  However, within the play there were those that did rise to the occasion, or achieve their moments of complete connection to the material. This production is clearly led by Carly Germany* as Lady Macbeth. Here is an actress that fires on all cylinders every time she appears. With an expressive face, physicality and confidence, she creates a compelling performance. A captivating Kyle Carthens as Macduff finds his moments as his anger is tested. Leonard Goff is expressive as Duncan. Stephen Hood nails it as the Porter. Hood is a hot mess of alcohol laced comedic delight. Greg White reminds me of Sidney Poitier, by projecting all class and style. “They call me Mr. Banquo”.

It felt like Jimmie Woody as Macbeth, needed to dive deeper into his character to sustain the energy and drive. There were moments of clarity and power, but not the overall punch that was needed. The witches (Chinetha Hall, Emily Terry, and Tina Tompkins) were effective, and certainly moved together with sensuous purpose and mischief. And as one of the murderers, remind me never to piss off Calvin Willis Jr.

The Set Design and Projections didn’t seem electric enough. One major distraction is the scene at the water’s edge, where the film was on a loop and would jerk and replay itself during the scene. That was very distracting. The Costume Design (Angelina Herin) and Lighting Design (Andrew Eckert) were fine. Stage Manager Julia Perez called a good show, except for the beginning of Act Two, where the timing of music going off and the action starting seemed off, leaving some dead air.

I love when a theatre company takes risks and pushes to break new ground. Congrats to both producing parties for remounting such an original production, that has such a powerful history and purpose.

*Member of Actor’s Equity Association

Tpography.com

5/26/14

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May 23 – June 8
Showtimes:
8pm Thursdays
8pm Fridays
8pm Saturdays
2pm Sundays

Tickets:
$12-$22 General Admission

(216) 321-2930

Order Tickets Online

Location:
Ensemble Theatre
2843 Washington Blvd

Cleveland, OH 44118

Customer Service SHOUT OUT – Angie Balfour at Cleveland Public Theatre

As I hop around to different theatres, you start to get a sense of the individuals that are on the front lines of the theatre. These individuals interact with you before, during intermission, and sometimes after the performance. So, I thought I would throw some recognition to those that come to mind.

One such fierce person is Angie Balfour. You will find her most of the time behind the concession stand at Cleveland Public Theatre. I may also remember her because I gave her too much money one time, and she called me back to make it right. But I see her interact with many, and she is surely a pleasant soul with patrons.

When you go into a theatre, you could get turned off if you have a bad experience within the space. Every player contributes to the positive experience. Angie Balfour is a welcoming presence for this patron.

Ancestra at Cleveland Public Theatre

Ancestra

If I were a woman, and trust me, for years I have been convinced that I am a black woman at heart, I would be especially outraged and inspired by the performance of “Ancestra” at the Cleveland Public Theatre.  Within the play, women’s rights are explored from a historical and topical perspective. The voices of pioneer women are in supposition with current day decisions that affect us all. And if you don’t think women have had it rough, consider this. In 1976, the first marital rape law is enacted in Nebraska, making it illegal for a husband to rape his wife.  You read that correctly, 1976! So spare me the “women are emotional” bullshit, when the sisters get together and demand to be heard.

There are three major components of the piece. The first being an exploration of women’s struggles in the 1800s, that is creatively presented in a secret place that is located “in the woods”, where thoughts, expressions and debates can take place without consternation. It is in this sacred space, that we meet the women, Lucy Stone (a fiery Katy Lynn Patterson) and Antoinette Brown (a classic jewel Lauren Joy Fraley), who would go on to become a major influence in the women’s rights movement. The second component is watching the major players in The National Women’s Rights Convention of 1853, right here in Cleveland.

The third component is a contemporary story of one woman struggling with issues of women’s health and reproductive rights. She begins investigating abortion clinics and what information is being presented to potential clients. But after a personal surprise, all her investigative instincts are challenged by her own real life decision making process.

These components are beautifully woven into a flowing and adeptly paced showcase of talent. The May Pole of the evening is Cora, powerfully played by Chris Sebert. GDFS! You will understand those letters after you see this production. Sebert is memorizing as we follow her from investigative reporter, to eventually, watching one of the most gut wrenching decisions that a women will ever have to make in her lifetime. Faye Hargate plays double duty as a fierce activist Abby Kelley Foster, and Cora’s sister Marian. Hargate displays superlative character choices in both historical genres. Anne McEvoy is on fire throughout this piece. Whether communicating where woman’s rights need to be, kicking scholastic ass or playing Cora’s mom, Jan.  McEvoy brings a beautiful sense of communicative edification, and serving motherly realness with passionate humanity.

Sally Groth* delivers solid gold. Groth is SO impressive in each of her characters. I was ready to march into hell for a heavenly cause every time she spoke. One spitfire that caught my eye was Patterson, who commands attention with the personified core of Lucy Stone, and comedic chops that could easily get Officer Dynn a spin off series. Fraley is just radiant on stage and delivers confidence at every turn of Antoinette Brown. Rhoda Rosen is just supreme class.  Rosen brings quality and honesty to every nuanced word she speaks. Sarah Moore delights as Martha Wright, Tanera Hutz (a little hard to hear in the opening office scene) is a beautiful presence, and Sarah Moore is solid force of nature.

This piece was written by Holly Holsinger and Chris Seibert, along with Renee Schilling and Sally Groth. I loved this play. Holsinger masterfully directed this piece. She kept the audience engaged throughout, while making sure that we left educated about women’s rights, and/or provoked to realize the struggle. Aaron Benson needs a round of applause for the exciting and beautiful scenic design. The woods never looked more hauntingly beautiful. Tesia Dugan Benson provided sharp costume design for both eras with creative passion. Once again, Benjamin Gantose heightened the play with ascetic visuals. Stage Manager Sarah Lynne Nicholas called a terrific show.

There is a line somewhere in this play that Cora says to the women at the convention: “and no one remembers your names”. That line hit me hard. As a gay man, I don’t know one name of any of the drag queens that bravely fought back against persecution at the Stonewall Inn. The Stonewall riots are largely regarded as a catalyst for the LGBT movement for civil rights in the United States. It discourages me that not one of their names is prominent. So, I applaud these courageous women who created this piece. They have connected with our current history, by connecting us with the past, and as a result, given heightened awareness to some incredibly brave and pioneering women.

SEE IT! If you have never been to Cleveland Public Theatre, I think this is a great piece to get your theatrical feet wet. This show is an excellent example of the process, the message, the execution and the social impact of creating a powerful piece of theatre.

*Member of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States, appearing under a Special Appearance Contract.

Tpography.com

5/24/14

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May 22 – June 7
Showtimes:
7:30pm Thursdays
7:30pm Fridays
7:30pm Saturdays
7:30pm Mondays

Tickets:
$12-$28 General Admission

(216) 631-2727 x501

Order Tickets Online

Location:
Cleveland Public Theatre
6415 Detroit Avenue
Cleveland, Ohio 44102

This is Not the Play at Cleveland Public Theatre

I have been intrigued of late when I have heard J.K. Rowling talk about her characters in the Harry Potter series. I found it fascinating that when a character meets their fate, Rowling stated that she is emotionally involved, even bringing her to tears upon a characters death. What an amazing relationship to exist inside the head of a playwright. So it was with great delight, that I discovered the current production at Cleveland Public Theatre actually explored that theme.

So, what are we talking about here. A gritty, in-your-face comedy that digs into what we naturally turn away from, racism. “This Is Not the Play” imagines a black playwright trying to write a play about white people. The problem is that the characters seem to have minds of their own. The playwright sends in her agent to interrogate the characters and then she tries to intervene as they expose their pathetically racist and patently disempowered viewpoints. Is this the playwright’s reflection on racism, or on her own prejudice?

“This is Not the Play” by Chisa Hutchinson, in a regional premiere, is a unique one act experience that delves into the mind of a playwright, by actually interacting with the characters right in front of us. The Black playwright (a stunning Katrice Headd) is the voice you hear coming from all four corners of the performance in the round. She first encounters the first female character portrayed by a stunning Rebecca Frick. Her character starts off as a blond version of Sunny Delight, and would certainly be the cover girl for the magazine “Good Girls Don’t”.  Then, we meet some rough trade played to the hilt by Jessica Annunziata. I would not cut in front of her in line. The two ladies have wills of their own and have issues with the playwright’s direction of their characters, and the drama and bits of comedy begin.

To solve and negotiate the proceedings, what better choice then send your snarky literary agent played devilishly by Bobby Coyne. Coyne is a bipolar mess of hot and cold, and the middle makes you want to take a shower. After dramatically trying to make the playwrights vision of a “nice play about closet lesbians” come to life, it is time for mama playwright to enter the picture. Headd appears and personally addresses the situation with her creative kids gone wild. Headd is a beautiful presence on stage, with one of the fiercest faces that commands attention. Part of her intervention involves bringing in the big guns, or simply, Mother. Played with supreme crispness by Laura Starnik, she arrives with her set of guilt luggage and the tale of family bigotry.

Director Emily Ritger does a nice job of keeping the players moving around the festive brain set that visually pops due to the fine work by Inda Blatch-Geib and Dred Geib. There were moments when the brooding dialogue seemed to lack variation in tone, but overall, I found the performances to be strong and interesting. The lighting and sound design rocked. Gregory S. Falcione and Mike Tutaj deserve a massive bar tab for their work. The effects almost upstaged the play itself. And a note about the stage manager calling the show, I thought it was called with tremendous timing. The execution of the cues was impressive.

Tpography.com

5/19/14

May 15 – May 31
Showtimes:
7pm Thursdays
7pm Fridays
7pm Saturdays
7pm Mondays


$12 Monday and Thursday performances
FREE BEER FRIDAY-mingle with the artists after the show while enjoying a FREE drink on CPT! 

Tickets:
$12-$18 General Admission

(216) 631-2727 extension 501
Order Tickets Online

Location:
Cleveland Public Theatre
6415 Detroit Avenue
Cleveland Ohio 44102

Fairfield by Eric Coble presented at The Helen by Cleveland Play House New Theatre Festival

Fairfield

I got to tell you, I just came from a staged reading of “Fairfield” by Eric Coble at the NEW. THEATRE. FESTIVAL. at the Cleveland Play House. This is truly one of the funniest plays I have EVER seen. Laura Kepley cast and directed this stage reading with a crazy stick of humor that was relentless.

It is February and you know what that means? Let the craziness begin.  Principal Angela Wadley (Nedra McClyde) addresses a student assembly and wants to celebrate Black History Month as an educational experience for all. But, when a young teacher, Crystal Finn (Laurie Kaminski), introduces some misguided attempts at celebrating Black History Month, the result is a hot mess of social discord. But due to the brilliant writing of Coble, comedic gold is served. Due to an altercation between a white and black boy in a “role playing exercise”, the kids’ parents get involved. Venessa and Daniel Stubbs (Marinda Anderson and Bowman Wright) are the black parents that believe that Fairfield school is the place for their child. On the other hand, Molly and Scott Flemmingsen (Jessica Dickey and Rob McClure), the white parents, believe in Fairfield as well. Well, at least they did before the “incident”. What happens next is the most dysfunctional, funny, problem solving process I have ever seen.

Every actor on that stage brought it, sold it and nailed it. The audience was constantly engaged. I really haven’t heard an audience laugh that much at original material ever. What a joy it was to see another Coble production brought to life, and so deftly by Laura Kepley and the merry gang of creative actors.

Watch out for the full production next year. Trust me. You do NOT want to miss this show.

The School for Wives at Coach House Theatre

I am really digging Coach House Theatre in Akron, Ohio. Once again, I make the modest trek to the house of Nancy Cates* and Terry Burgler*, Co-Artistic Directors, and I couldn’t be happier. This time around they present “The School for Wives,” which is a theatrical comedy written by the 17th century French playwright Molière, and considered by some critics to be one of his finest achievements. Directed by Burgler, this rompy farce is an over the top chuckle fest with a cast that chews more scenery than a festive group of carpenter ants.

The story involves Arnolphe (Andrew Cruse**), who has raised the young Agnès (Tess Burgler) since the age of 4. Arnolphe supports Agnès living in a nunnery until the age of 17, when he removes her and moves her to one of his abodes, which he keeps under the name of Monsieur de la Souche (Cruse). His intention is to bring up Agnès in such a manner that she will be too ignorant to be unfaithful to him. As a result, he forbids the nuns who are instructing her from teaching her anything that might lead her astray. His good friend Chrysalde (Ryan Christopher Zarecki) warns Arnolphe of his downfall, but Arnolphe takes no heed. After Agnès moves into Arnolphe’s house, Horace (Joe Pine) arrives on the scene ahead of his father, Arnolphe’s friend. Oronte. Horace immediately falls in love with Agnès and she with him. Not realizing that Arnolphe and Monsieur de la Souche are the same person, Horace unwittingly confides all his activities with Agnès to Arnolphe. Arnolphe then schemes to outmaneuver Horace and ensure that Agnès will marry him. To assist Arnolphe in his plans are his two servants, Alain (Benjamin Fortin) and Georgette (Katie Zarecki). And with their help, the plan gets very twisted and bumbled to our pleasure. Even a Notary (Mark Stoffer), called in by Arnolphe, gets caught up in the shenanigans.

A powerful irony waits as Oronte (Timothy Champion), Horace’s father, and Enrique (Alfred Anderson), Chrysalides’ father-in-law, arrive on the scene and announce that Horace is to marry Enrique’s daughter. Da Dum. That was said to music. Thank you.

With Godzilla opening this weekend, it reminds me that Cruse has the Godzilla role when it comes to lines. Immediately, Cruse sets a rapport with the audience that he successfully retains throughout, to delightful effect. Throw John Ritter into the 17th century and out pops Cruse, cranking on all cylinders. Coach House must be thrilled that their new neighbors are the Zarecki’s. Ryan Zarecki is a confident, fun, diction perfect Chrysalde. His delivery and energy is a joy to watch. And his wife, Katie Zarecki, is one-half of the fierce sidekicks of Arnolphe, along with Fortin. Both of them remind me of security detail at Meerkat Manor, and deliciously provide hilarious results. They are bumbling, very funny, and add tremendously to the antics. Burgler brings her Stepford Wife realness to Agnès. Playing stiff with an innocent veneer, she underplays well, so her moments of rebellion are fabulous. Pine delivers another strong performance as a love sick puppy, which creates more energy than an atom-smashing particle accelerator.  Stoffer comes in late, but adds comedic timing of his own. And Anderson and Champion, with great characterizations, bring the whole wonderful mess to a festive close.

Random thoughts: loved the way the fourth wall was broken and executed, enjoyed the fact that little note held such a long speech, and I thought the backstage vocal antics and suggested actions were gold.

The Production staff did a great job. Fierce Costume Design by Jonathan Fletcher. It was like every male had a folic bouncy castle on his head. Delightful. Lighting Design by Buddy Taylor. (There seemed to be some buzzing in Act 2, whether that was a lighting fixture or sound). Sound Design by Mark Stoffer. Set Design by Terry Burgler was awesome. Stage Manager Michael Cranston called a clean show.

*Member SDC, the Society of Stage Directors  & Choreographers

**Member, Actor’s Equity Association

TPOGraphy.com

5/17/14

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May 8 – June 1
Showtimes:
8pm Thursdays
8pm Fridays
8pm Saturdays
2:30pm Sundays

 

Tickets:
$12-$20

(330) 434-7741

Order Tickets Online

Location:
Coach House Theatre
732 West Exchange Street

Akron, OH 44302

 

Left in Ink at cleveland PUBLIC theatre

In the United States, a person dies by suicide every 13.7 minutes, claiming more than 38,000 lives each year. It is estimated that an attempt is made every minute, with close to 1 million people attempting suicide annually. Suicide is the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. among adults 18-65, the second leading cause of death among teens and young adults, and individuals ages 65 and older account for 16% of all suicide deaths. This is a public health issue that does not discriminate by age, gender, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status.*

I have seen suicide claim many lives in my lifetime. When I was younger, a number of young men took their lives because they couldn’t handle being gay. As I grew older, neighbors had family members who chose this end, friends lost their internal struggle, and families that I knew for a very long time lost a loved one. One of those family members has created an experience to explore their loss, and the issues involved with dealing with it personally, within the family, and publicly. It is their truth to tell. But Caitlin Lewins, a Cleveland Public Theatre Joan Yellen Horvitz Director Fellow, has expanded her own truth to include others’ struggles in a piece titled “Left in Ink,” currently running in the Storefront Studio space. These fictional characters that inhabit this presentation are based on interviews from Colleen Byers, Tony Cintrony, Kelly Lozar, David Ploenzke, and Emily Seigel. The interviews were then transcribed by Caitlin Lewins, Dylan Winter Dwyer, and Darius Stubbs. Some material from “Left in Ink” was developed for Leap/Conceive last fall with Elizabeth Kelly, Alice Nelson, and Jill Tighe.

The ensemble approach to this moving and thought provoking piece includes Megan Brautigam, Jeanne Madison, Brett Radke, Amy Schwabauer, Jerry Tucker and the haunting recorded voice of Anne McEvoy, each one of them didactically taking the stories and sharing them beautifully with the audience. It begins at a frenetic pace, with storylines coming at you from a choreographed synapse of information. Eventually, slices of the scenes are slowed down to allow connection to characters and stories, or parts of the stories to which individuals can relate.  There are moments where it is okay to laugh. You have to at some point, and Schwabauer and Radke provide that release; Schwabauer as an overall presence and Radke making a sheet cake that is poetically funny and sad at the same time. But every actor serves reality with the utmost respect. And as the furniture accumulates behind the actors, at the end, each piece represented one of the questions that I felt personally connected to, such as:

How do you find out? How do you react? How do you tell people that they are being insensitive? How do you get through the day? How do you get through the holidays? How do you handle what is left on the Internet forever? How do you handle that talking about suicide is not a popular topic? How do we cope? How do we grieve? How do we handle songs on the radio?

The production elements were strong. Dan Kilbane called a great show. Sounds Designer and CPT Kulas Composer Fellow Patrick Fellow added electronic realness. Cassie Goldbach and Val Kozlenko provided a fascinating and efficient Lighting Design (loved the different lights and fixtures) and Set Design. Alison Garrigan brought her Costume Design excellence once again.

Additional text for the project was provided by Jane Lewins. Momma needed to be recognized.

We all need to talk. We all need to be educated. I was in a better position after watching this performance to know I needed to know more. That is a powerful piece of theatre.

Tpography.com

5/15/14

Please reference “Tpography.com” with any quotes. Thank you.

* http://afsp.donordrive.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.eventGroup&eventGroupID=9AA117B3-F522-BB6D-359D1AA2D75A7958

There is also a walk for awareness scheduled for Cleveland.   http://afsp.donordrive.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.event&eventID=2675

 

May 15 – May 31
Showtimes:
7pm Thursdays
7pm Fridays
7pm Saturdays
7pm Mondays


$12 Monday and Thursday performancesFREE BEER FRIDAY-mingle with the artists after the show while enjoying a FREE drink on CPT! 

Tickets:
$12-$18 General Admission
216) 631-2727 extension 501

Order Tickets OnlineLocation:
Cleveland Public Theatre
6415 Detroit Avenue
Cleveland, Ohio 44102

Fox on the Fairway at Clague Playhouse

Ron Newell has given Clague Playhouse’s back nine a hilarious comedic shine by directing “Fox on the Fairway.” Mr. Newell has assembled a troupe of ferocious comedians in top form to rock the three-sided golf course. This  jewel was written by Ken Ludwig, who is an internationally acclaimed playwright. His first play on Broadway, “Lend Me A Tenor,” which The New York Times called “one of the two great farces by a living writer,” won three Tony Awards and was nominated for nine. His other best-known Broadway and West End shows include “Crazy For You,” “Moon Over Buffalo,” “Leading Ladies,” and “Twentieth Century.” With such great material, I was thrilled that the production matched expectations.

Bingham (Lou Will), president of the Quail Valley Country Club, is in a difficult position, because he found out that the golfer he thought would play for his club has switched sides due to being recruited by his opponent, the cocky and arrogant Dickie (Lance Switzer). Bingham’s stress in increased by the fact that he wagered a huge bet, which includes a store owned by his wife, Muriel (Margy Haas), which is now likely to be lost.  Fortunately, his newly hired hand, Justin (Jeremy Jenkins), is actually quite good at golf and Bingham finagles his entry into the tournament with the help of Pamela (Donna Case), his club’s vice-president. Justin does not disappoint and has a huge lead, but when Justin learns that Louise (Debbie Lenarz), a waitress at the club house, has lost the engagement ring he gave her, he comes unglued. The game resumes the next day, but Justin loses the lead and, upset, takes an unfortunate swing, breaking his arm. Bingham is desperate, and the appearance of his wife complicates the matter, as she catches him much too close to Pamela. Can Bingham find a replacement for Justin to win the game and the wager? There lies the rub.

Under the magnificent direction of Newell, this cast works like a well-oiled machine. Will is a blast as the tortured club president, and is the anchor to this piece. Whether he is grumpy, scheming or amorous, Will is a delight. Case is on top of her game, giving comedy some glamour and physical shtick to boot. Switzer is a shoo-in for winning every ugly sweater contest in the county; he is a hoot as he perfectly embodies the villain. Very funny stuff from an accomplished performer. Jenkins is fantastic as the lovesick golf phenom. His skills are kicking, and result in a lot of laughter. Lenarz is right on target, especially in the red dress, and adds to the merriment with some great acting chops. And I just want to wrap up Haas in a to-go box because she delivers one of the best “punch” lines I have ever seen. It literally took me a full minute to stop laughing. Awesome stuff.

Ron Newell. Can I just take a moment and write a brief love letter. As I sat there gazing at the impeccable set, it just reminded me of what a treasure this man is to Cleveland. Newell is an accomplished actor, director, set designer and one of the most down-to-earth, talented artists you will ever meet. He is such an incredible positive force in this community, and definitely proves that there is power in supportive genuine artistry. As his bio states “When asked why he keeps going, he quotes ‘An object in motion stays in motion. An object at rest stays at rest.’ When I’m the ‘object,’ I prefer the latter.Love and Respect – Ron.” Well, I think I can safely say the Cleveland theatre community has more Love and Respect for you than you might ever know.

For anyone who has worked at Clague Playhouse, you know that the production staff is one of the best of any theatre in the area. Volunteers are fierce contributors to this Westside gem. Fine work Production Manager Gig Giauque, Stage Manager Tod Huffman (Calling a great and complicated show), Set Designer Ron Newell, Lighting Designer Jeff Lockshine (One of the best in the Biz), Sound Designer Bryan Ritchey (lots of sound effects handled beautifully), Costume Designer D. Justin Bilewicz, III (nailing it big time).

I had a great time. If you want to laugh, get out and see this.

TPOGRAPHY.COM

5/14/14

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May 2 – May 25
Showtimes:
8pm Thursdays
8pm Fridays
8pm Saturdays
2pm Sundays

Tickets: 440-331-0403
$10-$16 Reserved Seating(440) 331-0403

Location:
Clague Playhouse
1371 Clague Road
Westlake, OH 44145

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